Canadian Fraud Law

Canadian Fraud Law

Commentary, News and Updates

Court’s contempt power not to be used to coerce payment

David Gadsden Posted in Fraud Recovery

In a recent 2016 decision in Greenberg v. Nowack, Justice Perell of the Ontario Superior Court of Justice dismissed a contempt motion against a stubborn and non-compliant debtor in a judgment debtor examination gone awry. Although sympathetic to the Plaintiffs’ frustration at being unable to recover monies on their  judgement, the Court ruled that imprisoning the debtor would be harsh and ineffectual. Justice Perell made this observation about the contempt motion: Continue Reading

Thawing out an asset freeze

Matt Saunders Posted in Injunctions & Emergency Relief

Thawing assetsOne of the most powerful pre-judgment remedies available to a plaintiff is a Mareva injunction freezing the defendant’s assets before trial. The Mareva injunction is a powerful tool for levelling the playing field when dealing with those who, left to their own devices, would dissipate their assets in order to frustrate the claims of their creditors.  Due to its extraordinary effect, the parties to such an injunction can seek to thaw the freezing order to access funds or assets.  As recent case law has shown, the tests to be met differ for defendants and plaintiffs, and a number of factors ought to be considered before a request is made to thaw assets frozen under a Mareva. Continue Reading

Global compliance programs offer inoculation against the rising tide of global risk

Peter MacKay Posted in Investigations & Compliance

In an age of massive data leaks, whistleblower bounties, and multimillion-dollar fines for violations of bribery and corruption laws, multinational corporate executives and board members must prioritize the implementation of robust anti-corruption compliance programs to safeguard their companies and shareholder value. The goal of any anti-corruption compliance program is to prevent and detect misconduct. However, as importantly, good governance can help strengthen the rule of law and the communities in which our corporations operate, both here at home and around the world. Read more about the importance of implementing effective compliance programs in this recent Law Times article.

 

 

 

Court of Appeal upholds trial decision awarding HSBC judgments in fraud for over $10.3 million

Michael NowinaMatt Saunders Posted in Fraud and Insolvency Law

In Turbo Logistics Canada Inc. v. HSBC Bank Canada, Baker & McKenzie’s litigation team was successful in upholding at the Ontario Court of Appeal, the trial decision awarding HSBC judgments in fraud for over $10.3 million dollars. At trial, Madam Justice Ruth Mesbur accepted the argument that “but for” the false statements made by the appellants, HSBC would never have made the loan and therefore the bank deserved damages equal to 100% of its loss on the loan. On appeal, the appellants argued that their rights under Canada’s Charter of Rights and Freedoms had been violated during the trial and that the trial should never have proceeded because an adjournment should have been granted. Continue Reading

Using the tort of civil conspiracy

Cherrine Chow Posted in Fraud Prevention, Fraud Recovery

Ponzi schemes and other fraudulent arrangements that operate on a large scale often involve complex networks of activities, actors, and funds transfers. Given the number of players that may be required to bring about such a scheme, the tort of civil conspiracy provides a potential means for recovery for fraud victims.

The elements of civil conspiracy: Simple motive or unlawful means?

As outlined in the Supreme Court of Canada’ decision in Canada Cement LaFarge Ltd. v. British Columbia Lightweight Aggregate Ltd. civil conspiracy in Canada is comprised of two related but distinct categories.  The first category is the “lawful means” or “simple motive” conspiracy, and the second is the “unlawful means” or “unlawful conduct” conspiracy. Continue Reading