Canadian Fraud Law

Canadian Fraud Law

Commentary, News and Updates

Jagged Little Pill: What “You Oughta Know” Regarding Agency Fraud

Mark Ellis Posted in Employment Related Fraud, Fraud Prevention

Recently Canadian singer Alanis Morissette became the latest well-publicized victim of fraud at the hands of one she employed and trusted: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/36316327. She joins a long list of celebrities who have suffered fraud at the hands of those employed to trust, amongst them the Beatles, Beyoncé, David Bowie, Billy Joel, Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Elvis, the Rolling Stones. Continue Reading

No trial required: Summary Judgment granted in fraud case

Sarah Petersen Posted in Fraud Recovery, Injunctions & Emergency Relief

In DBDC Spadina Ltd et al v Norma Walton et al, Justice Newbould of the Ontario Superior Court recently granted a motion for summary judgment on the basis that there was sufficient evidence to justify a finding of fraud. The decision reflects the guidance set out in the landmark Supreme Court Canada decision Hyrniak v. Mauldin, 2014 SCC 7, which recognized that the adjudicative process can be fair and just without requiring the expense and delay of a trial. Continue Reading

Court rules “culpability is not a finite” in charitable donation scheme

Michael Nowina Posted in Fraud Prevention

According to Statistics Canada, 84% of Canadians aged 15 and over, or just under 24 million people, reported making at least one financial donation to a charitable or non-profit organization when the last survey on gift giving was conducted in 2010. With over $10 billion in yearly donations, it is unsurprising that there are those that seek to take advantage of Canadians’ spirit of giving. In a recent sentencing decision, R v Raza, 2016 BCSC 1030, the British Columbia Supreme Court sentenced two brothers, Fareed Raza and Saheem Raza, to over four (4) years for their roles in orchestrating a charitable donation scheme. Continue Reading

Courts give the green light for fraud-based class actions in Canadian insolvency proceedings

Michael Nowina Posted in Fraud and Insolvency Law

Both of Canada’s primary insolvency statutes, the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act (“BIA”) and the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act (“CCAA”) provide for an automatic stay of all legal proceedings when an insolvent debtor files for or seeks insolvency protection. The purpose of the stay is to provide breathing space to a debtor attempting to restructure its business so as to avoid “death by a thousand cuts” and also to ensure similarly situated creditors are treated equally. While it is an integral part of Canada’s insolvency regime, the stay of proceedings is not inviolable and there have been a number of noteworthy cases where Canadian courts have considered whether to lift the statutory stay and permit proposed class actions to proceed where the plaintiff has alleged fraud. Continue Reading

2016 Baker & McKenzie Global Data Breach Notification Guide

Michael Nowina Posted in Cybersecurity

Lock (colour)Global data breach notification requirements pose critical issues for legal departments, senior managers, and boards of companies in all industry sectors worldwide. The current environment creates a perfect storm with more data security threats, more vulnerabilities, and more data breach notification requirements. Baker & McKenzie provides this Global Data Breach Notification Guide as a resource for companies to benchmark the ever expanding range of global breach notification requirements. As always, this guide is not a substitute for legal advice, and in the event of an actual or potential incident, companies need to engage qualified counsel to advise on the application of local breach notification and other requirements to their particular circumstances.